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Esquire: “The New American Center”

Contributed by Stephen Coles on Oct 14th, 2013. Artwork published in 2013.
ESQ mag mock.jpg
Source: http://hellomattstevens.com. License: All Rights Reserved.

“I worked with Stravinsky Pierre at Esquire Magazine on a new political article, ‘The New American Center.’ The brief was to create an intro graphic and set of accompanying spot illustrations that captured these important political issues and also created a red/blue dualistic element to support the main idea of the article.” — Matt Stevens

The condensed sans is Graphik Compact, a variation of the Graphik family that Commercial Type created for various magazine clients and is not yet publicly available.

ESQ type final.jpg
Source: http://hellomattstevens.com. License: All Rights Reserved.
esquire_nac.jpg
Source: http://hellomattstevens.com. License: All Rights Reserved.
ESQ detail 02.jpg
Source: http://hellomattstevens.com. License: All Rights Reserved.
ESQ detail 07.jpg
Source: http://hellomattstevens.com. License: All Rights Reserved.
ESQ detail 06.jpg
Source: http://hellomattstevens.com. License: All Rights Reserved.
ESQ detail 04.jpg
Source: http://hellomattstevens.com. License: All Rights Reserved.
ESQ detail 05.jpg
Source: http://hellomattstevens.com. License: All Rights Reserved.

2 Comments on “Esquire: “The New American Center””

  1. Thomas Elder says:
    Oct 16th, 2013  3:19 pm
    Edit

    Who designed, or what font is the title font for Esquire magazine?

  2. Oct 16th, 2013  8:43 pm
    Edit

    The Esquire logo is hand lettering, not type. I don’t know who did the original, but it has seen many revisions over the years, the most recent was drawn in the early ’90s by Jim Parkinson (who was also responsible for the Rolling Stone logo) with Roger Black and Ann Pomeroy.

  3. Mar 10th, 2014  12:34 am
    Edit

    Esquire also has a cover gallery, starting with the very first cover in 1933. Wish I knew who did it!

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