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Galt Toys (1960s–70s)

Contributed by Stephen Coles on Jul 3rd, 2017. Artwork published in
circa 1961
.
    galt-toys-1.jpg
    Source: http://www.kengarland.co.uk License: All Rights Reserved.

    In 1961, Ken Garland redesigned the identity for Galt Toys, set in Folio. Later, the company accepted his offer to design their toys and games. They remained a client until 1982.

    When we were working for Galt Toys, although we used the same logo, we twisted it round and did umpteen versions of it and never let it stay the same. — Ken Garland, Eye

    The style was maintained consistently for 20 years. The letterforms chosen for GALT TOYS were from a very recently issued typeface, Folio Medium Extended. … [We] were determined not to let the Galt Toys logo become a sacred cow, not to be mucked about with (as was decreed with so many logos in the 50s and 60s). It would, indeed, be mucked around with, but only by us. — Ken Garland, Galy Tots

    7062570085_aeb534f681.jpg
    Source: http://www.kengarland.co.uk License: All Rights Reserved.

    Cover of first Galt Toys catalogue, 1961

    Cc3as-qWAAAtcto.jpg:large
    Source: https://twitter.com Image: Graphicacy. License: All Rights Reserved.
    7062570331_7ba093bb00_o.jpg
    Source: http://www.eyemagazine.com Image: Eye magazine. License: All Rights Reserved.

    publicity leaflet, 1967. Drawing by Wanda Garland.

    6896221024_742694cb7d_o.jpg
    Source: http://www.eyemagazine.com Image: Eye magazine. License: All Rights Reserved.

    publicity leaflet. Photography: Harriet Crowder.

    Galt-Post-Office-Ken-Garland-Associates-1967-produced-by-James-Galt_16.jpg
    Source: http://viewportmagazine.com Image: Viewport. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Galt Post Office, Ken Garland & Associates, 1967.

    tumblr_nxsq3xpcHH1snt1oto1_1280.jpg
    Source: http://englishmodernism.tumblr.com Image: Design for Today. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Box for Montage toy.

    tumblr_nfoyxeA7XF1snt1oto1_1280.jpg
    Source: http://englishmodernism.tumblr.com Image: Design for Today. License: All Rights Reserved.
    tumblr_o6a6omm4Gr1snt1oto1_1280.jpg
    Source: http://englishmodernism.tumblr.com Image: Design for Today. License: All Rights Reserved.
    galt-toys-14.jpg
    Source: http://www.kengarland.co.uk License: All Rights Reserved.
    trap-snap.jpg
    Source: https://modernmooch.com License: All Rights Reserved.
    octons.jpg
    Source: https://modernmooch.com License: All Rights Reserved.
    s-l1600.jpg
    Source: http://rover.ebay.com Image: “maine-vintage” on eBay. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Galt Connect, game and packaging designed by Ken Garland & Associates in 1969.

    s-l1600.jpg
    Source: http://rover.ebay.com Image: “maine-vintage” on eBay. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Galt Connect, game and packaging designed by Ken Garland & Associates in 1969.

    s-l1600.jpg
    Source: http://rover.ebay.com Image: “maine-vintage” on eBay. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Galt Connect, game and packaging designed by Ken Garland & Associates in 1969.

    048a.jpg
    Source: http://www.watermeloncat.nl Image: Watermelon Cat. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Ken Garland & Associates designed the original Fizzog matching game in 1969. This is a mid-1970s edition. The designer of this box is unclear, but it seems to have been released during Garland’s tenure.

    il_fullxfull.490855953_80yi.jpg
    Source: https://www.etsy.com Image: The Games Are Here. License: All Rights Reserved.

    The designer of this box is unclear, but it seems to have been released during Garland’s tenure.

    il_fullxfull.1211325817_q6wg.jpg
    Source: https://www.etsy.com Image: Viewridge Vintage. License: All Rights Reserved.

    One of two boxes for Linking Letters. The designer is unclear, but it seems to have been released during Garland’s tenure.

    il_fullxfull.1270784745_fp7j.jpg
    Source: https://www.etsy.com Image: Eclectic Haus Vintage. License: All Rights Reserved.

    One of two boxes for Linking Letters. The designer is unclear, but it seems to have been released during Garland’s tenure.

    8518568644_e18da72694_k.jpg
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Image: Rob McRorie. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Memory tile game with illustrations by Kenneth Townsend.

    tumblr_mcg247G9Jn1r8sip3o1_500.jpg
    Source: http://uniteditions.tumblr.com Image: Unit Editions. License: All Rights Reserved.
    1965_galt_toys_leaflet_1_0.jpg
    Source: https://www.creativereview.co.uk Image: Creative Review. License: All Rights Reserved.
    motherland_galt_hero.jpg
    Source: http://motherland.net Image: Unit Editions. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Catalog cover for Galt Toys, 1969–70, playing with the logotype (in Folio). The small type in the ‘O’ is Univers, which was often used as a secondary typeface during this period.

    Galy4.jpg
    Source: http://www.trunkrecords.com Image: Trunk Records. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Detail of above cover, reprinted as a limited-edition poster by Trunk Records.

    6896173914_8f1b8be25f_h.jpg
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Image: Eye magazine. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Catalog cover, 1974–75. Drawing by Daria Gan.

    1962_galt_toys_ad_0.jpg
    Source: https://www.creativereview.co.uk Image: Creative Review. License: All Rights Reserved.
    1968_galt_toys_catalogue_cover_0.jpg
    Source: https://www.creativereview.co.uk Image: Creative Review. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Typefaces

    • Folio
    • Futura Black
    • Antique Olive
    • Univers

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    2 Comments on “Galt Toys (1960s–70s)”

    1. Jul 3rd, 2017  12:31 am
    2. Nov 10th, 2017  12:44 am

      Much of the titling was set using Letraset’s version of Folio. If I remember correctly Ken rather liked the medium extended weight, which apparently wasn’t available in Linotype’s photosetting version.

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