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Le mot de Cambronne by Sacha Guitry (Le Livre de Poche, 1972)

Photo(s) by Alexis Orloff. Imported from Flickr on Jan 29, 2019. Artwork published in .
    Le mot de Cambronne by Sacha Guitry (Le Livre de Poche, 1972)
    Source: www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Alexis Orloff and tagged with “thorowgoodsansshaded”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Le mot de Cambronne (literally, “the word of Cambronne”) is named after General Pierre Cambronne, who supposedly made a one-word response to the British request that he surrender at the Battle of Waterloo. In his cover design, Jean-Pierre Rosier revealed the non-euphemistic version by highlighting the included letters in Thorowgood Sans Shaded.

    Sacha Guitry’s Le mot de Cambronne is a comedy in one act and one verse, written in 1936 for the Théâtre de la Madeleine. The play was also made into a film, directed by Guitry and released in 1937. In the play, Madame Cambronne – i.e. Mary Osburn, the Scottish nurse who had cared for Cambronne after Waterloo – wants to learn about the famous word named after her husband, but General Cambronne obstinately refuses to repeat it.

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    • Thorowgood Sans Shaded
    • Commercial Script
    • Modern No. 20

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