An independent archive of typography.
to participate.

Topics

Formats

Typefaces

Pareidolia

Contributed by Dimitris Florakis on Feb 17th, 2019. Artwork published in
July 2018
.
    Pareidolia 1
    Source: https://www.behance.net Photo: Dimitris Florakis. Loonatiks Design Crew. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Pareidolia is a Greek extra virgin olive oil, In the general direction of the studio, we chose to go with two very democratic and easy to find fonts, Arial and Cousine. With this we wanted to give a sense of simplicity and affordability despite the enigmatic name.

    Pareidolia 2
    Source: https://www.behance.net Photo: Dimitris Florakis. Loonatiks Design Crew. License: All Rights Reserved.
    Pareidolia 3
    Source: https://www.behance.net Photo: Dimitris Florakis. Loonatiks Design Crew. License: All Rights Reserved.
    Pareidolia 4
    Source: https://www.behance.net Photo: Dimitris Florakis. Loonatiks Design Crew. License: All Rights Reserved.
    Pareidolia 5
    Source: https://www.behance.net Photo: Dimitris Florakis. Loonatiks Design Crew. License: All Rights Reserved.
    Pareidolia 6
    Source: https://www.behance.net Photo: Dimitris Florakis. Loonatiks Design Crew. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Typefaces

    • Arial
    • Cousine

    Formats

    Topics

    Designers/Agencies

    Artwork location

    3 Comments on “Pareidolia”

    1. Thiago says:
      Feb 17th, 2019  3:44 pm

      The name isn’t that enigmatic, since many of us are familiar with pareidolia from the Internet. What is enigmatic is why an olive oil has this name. It would make sense if the brand relied on pareidolia, but among all these pictures I don’t see anything that looks like a face or something else, which was disappointing.

    2. Jake says:
      Feb 18th, 2019  4:20 am

      @Thiago: I note the rough texture of the label itself. I suspect they are referencing the tendency of such textures to occasionally create seemingly recognizable patterns out of total randomness.

      In general: I appreciate the notion of “simplicity and affordability”, but I don’t think simplifying the appearance conveys that attitude anymore. Indeed, my mind has come to involuntarily associate clean-lined, elegant minimalism like this with great expense—for which we can probably blame the industrial designers at such companies as Apple.

    3. Thiago says:
      Feb 18th, 2019  8:36 am

      I think the concept of “simplicity and affordability” is still alive in household products such as olive oil, although kept alive by generic supermarket brands.

      Generic supermarket brands

      I note the label looks like Google’s dictionary function, and would have looked more so if it had been wholly in Arial.

    Post a comment