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Accountancy Europe

Contributed by JAF on Feb 27th, 2019. Artwork published in
circa 2016
.
    Accountancy Europe 1
    Source: https://www.accountancyeurope.eu © Accountancy Europe. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Accountancy Europe – an association of professional organizations of auditors in Europe – uses JAF Domus Titling for its new identity. The typeface is used for the interior design as well as the printed matter. The letter A is used in a customized form without bar.

    More JAF Domus Titling in use for Accountancy Europe can be seen on their Flickr pages.

    Accountancy Europe 2
    Source: https://www.accountancyeurope.eu © Accountancy Europe. License: All Rights Reserved.
    Accountancy Europe 3
    Source: https://www.accountancyeurope.eu © Accountancy Europe. License: All Rights Reserved.
    Accountancy Europe 4
    Source: https://www.accountancyeurope.eu © Accountancy Europe. License: All Rights Reserved.
    Accountancy Europe 5
    Source: https://www.accountancyeurope.eu © Accountancy Europe. License: All Rights Reserved.

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    3 Comments on “Accountancy Europe”

    1. Thiago says:
      Feb 27th, 2019  4:27 pm

      Great pun.

      Also, I get that the period is kind of part of the brand, but it looks awkward in the annual report; adding a period makes it look like a sentence, and no one talks like that. I would rather see “2016 annual report”, or just the same title without a period.

    2. Feb 28th, 2019  1:12 pm

      no one talks like that.

      How would the title sound any different in spoken language without the period? A closing period once was very common on signs and other lettering, even for single words. You can find several examples tagged with “closing period” on my Flickr.

      Here’s a gym (German: Turnhalle) from Offenbach:

    3. Thiago says:
      Mar 4th, 2019  2:30 pm

      It wouldn’t, but the period is what makes me imagine the title being spoken, rather than merely seeing it as the label on the front; and thus calls to mind how it sounds weird when spoken. Anyone will say “Turnhalle”, as long as they are speaking German, but no one will say “annual report 2016", since in English you can’t put the date after things in this way – this is my 2019 comment, not my comment 2019.

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