An independent archive of typography.
to participate.

Topics

Formats

Typefaces

Nintendo Entertainment System consoles and components

Contributed by Stephen Coles on Mar 4th, 2019. Artwork published in .
    Nintendo Entertainment System, 1985
    Source: commons.wikimedia.org Photo by Evan Amos. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Nintendo Entertainment System, 1985

    Corporate’s wide stance, simplified forms, and rounded rectangles are strongly associated with 1970s–90s tech. The original Nintendo Entertainment System, and many of its related components, used the typeface for its name and other labeling, copying the ColecoVision from three years before.

    Corporate was released in 1971 by Alphabet Innovations, having licensed the design from its creator, Roc Mitchell. Mitchell passed away in 2015 after a 60-year career in commercial art — and his letters printed on millions of electronic gadgets.

    Nintendo Entertainment System controller
    Source: commons.wikimedia.org Photo by Evan Amos. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Nintendo Entertainment System controller

    Nintendo NES Four Score, 1990. This version of Corporate has angled cuts in many of the strokes. It’s available digitally as .
    Source: commons.wikimedia.org Photo by Evan Amos. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Nintendo NES Four Score, 1990. This version of Corporate has angled cuts in many of the strokes. It’s available digitally as Corporate URW.

    Nintendo Entertainment System, model NES-101, 1993
    Source: commons.wikimedia.org Photo by Evan Amos. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Nintendo Entertainment System, model NES-101, 1993

    3 Comments on “Nintendo Entertainment System consoles and components”

    1. It’s interesting that Corporate Gothic was used as a stand-in for the “official” Corporate, in the case of the Four Score. Speaking of NES 4-player adapters, anyone want to take a crack at the funky text on the NES Satellite?

    2. Hi Lee, sorry, I don’t recognize the style used for NES Satellite.

      Thank you also for sharing Ray Larabie’s observation that Corporate Gothic seems to be based on Microgramma as opposed to Corporate! I made a visual comparison and it definitely holds water.

      The image below shows Corporate URW (URW’s digital version of Corporate Gothic, top) vs. Eurostile Black Extended (again URW’s digitization, bottom; Microgramma is the caps-only precursor to Eurostile and only different in small details).

      About all the proportions match up. The most revealing details include the K with horizontal link and the Q. Compare to Corporate/Limit.

    3. Thanks, Florian!

      As long as we’re cataloguing other OEM NES accessories with unique logotypes (none of which seem to match one another), we’ve also got the NES Advantage and NES MAX controllers, both photos were taken from eBay auctions

      NES Advantage:

      NES MAX:

    4. Hello, Lee! The NES Satellite font reminds me somewhat of a font used by Konami in some Dance Dance Revolution games, especially the SuperNOVA entries to the series. I’m having trouble identifying it myself, but the Beatmania/DDR themed fan forums Zenius-i-Vanisher has a massive thread about identifying fonts used in the various Konami rhythm games if you feel so inclined to peruse for something similar.

    Post a comment