An independent archive of typography.
to participate.

Topics

Formats

Typefaces

Language: An Introduction to the Study of Speech by Edward Sapir

Contributed by Stephen Coles on Dec 21st, 2012. Artwork published in .
    Language: An Introduction to the Study of Speech by Edward Sapir
    Source: http://www.flickr.com Image via Julian Montague on Flickr. License: All Rights Reserved.

    This is an analog version of Baskerville that has not been digitized. Fry’s Baskerville comes closest to the title type, but there is nothing quite like the italic.

    Typefaces

    • Baskerville Old Face

    Formats

    Topics

    Designers/Agencies

    2 Comments on “Language: An Introduction to the Study of Speech by Edward Sapir”

    1. Chris Purcell says:
      Dec 22nd, 2012  4:28 am

      The italic looks close to Haas Caslon or Monotype Caslon — that’s a Caslon-ish p…but that w…you’re right, I haven’t found anyhting like it.

      Call up Milton and ask him.

    2. Blythwood says:
      Mar 12th, 2019  5:43 am

      I’m pretty sure this is ATF’s clone of Fry’s Baskerville. The italic is apparently a copy of the italic of the Bell typeface (not called that at the time they did it)-this is discussed in Nicolas Barker’s introduction to Morison’s biography of John Bell. But I’ve yet to see an explanation of why they didn’t just use Moore’s italic-did they think it was too narrow?  (ATF also added their usual set of swash capitals, none very idiomatic to the font style, in my view.)

      Austin (or his boss?) seems to have been completely obsessed with the italic 'p’-in some sizes a more Baskerville-style 'p’, or one that opens outwards like a modern-face 'h’, in some sizes (the small ones, but not the very smallest) no entrance stroke at all. (Johnston’s biography of Austin has some clearer images of his 20pt italic showing the first two of those, from a 1939 Taylor & Taylor specimen.)

    Post a comment