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Clip Books of Line Art, Volk (1968)

Photo(s) by Bart Solenthaler. Imported from Flickr on Feb 22, 2020. Artwork published in .
    “Old Fashioned” (No. 166) features two Western-style typefaces that probably originated at Filmotype in the 1960s. They’re both shown in an undated c.1974 Filmomaster specimen, as  and . The latter is also known as .
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “filmotypequincy” and “filmotypevanhorn”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Old Fashioned” (No. 166) features two Western-style typefaces that probably originated at Filmotype in the 1960s. They’re both shown in an undated c.1974 Filmomaster specimen, as Van Horn and Quincy. The latter is also known as Amanda.

    Covers for various clip books of line art issued in 1968 by Harry Volk Jr. Art Studio, Pleasantville, New Jersey. See the previous post about the “Entertainment” clip book from 1955 for more information on Harry Volk Jr. Art Studio.

    The bottom lines use Alternate Gothic Compressed and Univers.

    “Expressions” (No. 168) ft. . This old German typeface was adopted by Photo-Lettering and shown in their 1971 catalog as Reclame. The punctuation is from , see the comments.
    License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Expressions” (No. 168) ft. Reklame. This old German typeface was adopted by Photo-Lettering and shown in their 1971 catalog as Reclame. The punctuation is from Pistilli Roman, see the comments.

    “Strength” (No. 170) ft.  with tight and overlapping spacing and the monocular g.
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “westbehemoth”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Strength” (No. 170) ft. West Behemoth with tight and overlapping spacing and the monocular g.

    “Telephones” (No. 171) ft. Filmotype Gamma.
    Source: https://www.flickr.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Telephones” (No. 171) ft. Filmotype Gamma.

    “Summer” (No. 483) ft.  on an angle.
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “chwastarttone”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Summer” (No. 483) ft. Chwast Art Tone on an angle.

    “Marine” (No. 484) ft. .
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “kalligraphia”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Marine” (No. 484) ft. Kalligraphia.

    “Western” (No. 485) ft.  Italic with swashes.
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “bookman”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Western” (No. 485) ft. Bookman Italic with swashes.

    “Science” (No. 487) ft. .
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “britannic”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Science” (No. 487) ft. Britannic.

    “Fall & Winter Sports” (No. 488). This narrow grotesk looks a lot like an outlined version of , or maybe PLINC’s adaptation , but it seems the ampersand doesn’t match. Any insights are welcome. The same outlined style appears on Volk covers from 1964 and 1974, while the “Law & Order” booklet from 1966 uses the similar .
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “schmalfettegrotesk”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Fall & Winter Sports” (No. 488). This narrow grotesk looks a lot like an outlined version of Schmalfette Grotesk, or maybe PLINC’s adaptation Swiss Gothic, but it seems the ampersand doesn’t match. Any insights are welcome. The same outlined style appears on Volk covers from 1964 and 1974, while the “Law & Order” booklet from 1966 uses the similar Permanent Headline.

    “Groups” (No. 494) ft.  Light.
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “futura”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Groups” (No. 494) ft. Futura Light.

    “Occupations” (No. 497) likewise shows light caps from . Illustration by Tom Sawyer.
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “futura”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Occupations” (No. 497) likewise shows light caps from Futura. Illustration by Tom Sawyer.

    “Women” (No. 499) ft.  in all caps.
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “smoke”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Women” (No. 499) ft. Smoke in all caps.

    “Register and Vote” from the Paste Pot & Scissors subseries (No. PP 105), ft.  and . The small type at the bottom is in .
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “pacellamonitor” and “franklingothic”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Register and Vote” from the Paste Pot & Scissors subseries (No. PP 105), ft. Franklin Gothic and Pacella Monitor. The small type at the bottom is in Eurostile.

    “Announcers” from the Paste Pot & Scissors subseries (No. PP 107), ft. Photo-Lettering’s  with swash alternates and overlapping glyphs.
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “westbehemothitalic”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Announcers” from the Paste Pot & Scissors subseries (No. PP 107), ft. Photo-Lettering’s West Behemoth Italic with swash alternates and overlapping glyphs.

    “Luck” from the Paste Pot & Scissors subseries (No. PP 108), ft.  (with contour), another face available from Photo-Lettering. It might also be Jim Dandy, a contoured variant of  by Lettergraphics.
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by Bart Solenthaler and tagged with “mansard”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Luck” from the Paste Pot & Scissors subseries (No. PP 108), ft. Mansard (with contour), another face available from Photo-Lettering. It might also be Jim Dandy, a contoured variant of Slim Dandy by Lettergraphics.

    2 Comments on “Clip Books of Line Art, Volk (1968)”

    1. When compared with other Volk booklets from other years, it’s interesting to see that this volume appears to mark the change from Filmotype faces (see e.g. the covers from 1960) to Photo-Lettering.

    2. The pile of assorted accents and punctuation used in “Expressions” as a typographic equivalent of cursing appears to be taken directly from a specimen for Pistilli Roman, designed by Herb Lubalin and used to announce the International Type Face Competition sponsored by the Visual Graphics Corporation in 1965. Here’s the announcement as shown in Graphis No. 121.

      Scan courtesy of IADDB.

      Pistilli’s punctuation was again prominently featured on the cover of the 1977 reprint of You Have A Point There: A Guide to Punctuation and its Allies.

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