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Talkin and Testifyin by Geneva Smitherman (Houghton Mifflin, 1977; Wayne State University Press, 1986)

Contributed by Florian Hardwig on Feb 24th, 2021. Artwork published in
circa 1977
.
    Book jacket of the hardback edition by Houghton Mifflin, Boston, 1977. The title is set in a condensed . Author name and subtitle are in what looks like . This revival of  was made by Vincent Pacella. It wasn’t released by ITC before 1982, so this is probably a precursor that was exclusively available from Photo-Lettering, Inc. Pacella worked at PLINC where many of the ITC fonts were produced. The photograph is by Todd Tarbox.
    Source: https://archive.org License: All Rights Reserved.

    Book jacket of the hardback edition by Houghton Mifflin, Boston, 1977. The title is set in a condensed Goudy Heavyface. Author name and subtitle are in what looks like ITC Cushing. This revival of Cushing Oldstyle was made by Vincent Pacella. It wasn’t released by ITC before 1982, so this is probably a precursor that was exclusively available from Photo-Lettering, Inc. Pacella worked at PLINC where many of the ITC fonts were produced. The photograph is by Todd Tarbox.

    From the inner flap:

    In this important and controversial book, Geneva Smitherman defines Black English as
    comprising a set of grammatical and phonetic rules, a special lexicon, and a particular rhetorical style. In analyzing these elements, she discusses attitudes toward language and explains the differences in usage and in linguistic attitudes that often lead to misunderstandings between blacks and whites and offers specific suggestions for public policy that would recognize the validity and make use of Black English. Shifting occasionally into Black Idiom as she writes, Dr. Smitherman makes clear that Black English is a vital and effective language, as legitimate a form of speech as British, American, or Australian English.

    Dr. Smitherman relies heavily on black culture and its inherent African oral tradition for examining and understanding black speech. Talkin and Testifyin provides the immediacy of a culture, language, and experience that ranges from African villages to Motown, from myth to reality, from the sacred to the secular. Interwoven throughout the text as evidence for the author’s arguments are the words of Frederick Douglass, Curtis Mayfield, W.E.B. Dubois, Richard Pharr, lmamu Baraka, Claude Brown, Nikki Giovanni, Smokey Robinson, Maya Angelou, Richard Wright, Bessie Smith, the Reverend Jesse Jackson, Stag-O-Lee, Martin Luther King, Jr. , Chinua Achebe, Langston Hughes, James Brown, Adam Clayton Powell, Isaac Hayes, Malcolm X, Aretha Franklin, Haki Madhubuti, Frankie Crocker, the Reverend C.L. Franklin, Jesse B. Simple, and many others.

    Title page of the Houghton Mifflin edition.  Italic is used for the title (with swash caps), and  for other text.
    Source: https://archive.org License: All Rights Reserved.

    Title page of the Houghton Mifflin edition. Cooper Black Italic is used for the title (with swash caps), and Baskerville for other text.

    Cover of the paperback edition by Wayne State University Press, Detroit, 1986, pairing  and .
    Source: https://jellobiafrasays.tumblr.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Cover of the paperback edition by Wayne State University Press, Detroit, 1986, pairing Baby Teeth and ITC Avant Garde Gothic.

    Typefaces

    • Goudy Heavyface
    • ITC Cushing
    • Baby Teeth
    • ITC Avant Garde Gothic
    • Cooper Black
    • Baskerville

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