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Urban Wood Goods

Contributed by Exhibea on Oct 13th, 2020. Artwork published in
July 2020
.
    Urban Wood Goods 1
    Anna Mort. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Urban Wood Goods build furniture from reclaimed wood. The logo combines five typefaces: Gothic Leavenworth, Gothic Medium, Landry Gothic, Public Notice JNL, and Times Gothic Bold. “After designing the logo and icon, we had each of the characters CNC-cut from Urban Wood Good’s supply of reclaimed wood, then inked them up and printed them to create the final versions.”, says identity designer Anna Mort.

    The website was designed by Exhibea. All typography uses a simple system of two font families, Unit Gothic (718 and 720) and URW’s Futura. Both of these fonts are revivals, digitizations of wood type and metal type.

    Urban Wood Goods 2
    Source: urbanwoodgoods.com License: All Rights Reserved.
    Urban Wood Goods 3
    Anna Mort. License: All Rights Reserved.
    Urban Wood Goods 4
    Anna Mort. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Typefaces

    • Gothic Leavenworth
    • Gothic Medium
    • Landry Gothic
    • Public Notice JNL
    • Times Gothic
    • Unit Gothic
    • Futura

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    5 Comments on “Urban Wood Goods”

    1. Hi Exhibea, that’s lovely!
      Is the logo made from digital fonts (including Unit Gothic, perhaps?), or is it based on actual vintage wood type? Your description (“using grotesque wood type specimens”) suggests the latter – do you recall which ones you chose? The bold wide letters – R N (flipped) G S – appear to be from Gothic (Nesbitt) or a version thereof.

    2. Hi Florian, thank you. A combination of digital fonts and vintage wood types.

      4 types of Gothic referenced for the logo:

      Gothic, 1838
      Landry Gothic, 2003
      Gothic Medium, 2008
      Times Gothic, 2009

    3. Thank you for the extra info and the font IDs! I’ve added them to the list of typefaces.

      For others who dig the vintage mix-and-match look but don’t want to compile a set of font ingredients themselves, I can recommend Woodkit. This extensive type system by Ondrej Jób offers a ready-made solution.

      Image: Typotheque.

    4. What an incredible resource – thanks for sharing.

    5. Designer Anna Mort kindly chimed in and provided us with detailed information about the logo design including the specific fonts in use, as well as better images. The post has been updated to reflect that. Thanks, Anna!

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