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100 Jahre Kulturgesellschaft Glarus

Contributed by Dafi Kühne on Jan 12th, 2021. Artwork published in
September 2020
.
    100 Jahre Kulturgesellschaft Glarus 1
    Photo: Dafi Kühne. License: All Rights Reserved.

    100 year anniversary poster for Kulturgesellschaft Glarus. Printed in 10 print runs from hand-cut linoleum (Anzeigen-Grotesk with a modified number 1) and hand-set metal type (4pt Salon-Antiqua from Haas’sche Schriftgiesserei). Party-party!

    Client: Kulturgesellschaft, Glarus
    Format: 70×100cm
    Paper: Forever Gelb, 200g/m²
    Edition: 450 posters on a Grafix GX4

    100 Jahre Kulturgesellschaft Glarus 2
    Photo: Dafi Kühne. License: All Rights Reserved.
    100 Jahre Kulturgesellschaft Glarus 3
    Photo: Dafi Kühne. License: All Rights Reserved.
    100 Jahre Kulturgesellschaft Glarus 4
    Photo: Dafi Kühne. License: All Rights Reserved.
    100 Jahre Kulturgesellschaft Glarus 5
    Photo: Dafi Kühne. License: All Rights Reserved.
    100 Jahre Kulturgesellschaft Glarus 6
    Photo: Dafi Kühne. License: All Rights Reserved.
    100 Jahre Kulturgesellschaft Glarus 7
    Photo: Dafi Kühne. License: All Rights Reserved.
    100 Jahre Kulturgesellschaft Glarus 8
    Photo: Dafi Kühne. License: All Rights Reserved.
    100 Jahre Kulturgesellschaft Glarus 9
    Photo: Dafi Kühne. License: All Rights Reserved.
    100 Jahre Kulturgesellschaft Glarus 10
    Photo: Dafi Kühne. License: All Rights Reserved.

    Typefaces

    • Anzeigen-Grotesk / Neue Aurora IX
    • Salon-Antiqua / Noblesse

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    1 Comment on “100 Jahre Kulturgesellschaft Glarus”

    1. What a fun poster!

      It might be the least important part of this design, but for type history buffs, the small card typeface used for the credit still is interesting. Brandon (Inland, 1898) and Engravers Roman (BB&S, 1899) are related precursors from the United States. Just like Anzeigen-Grotesk, this design originated at Wagner & Schmidt, a company in Leipzig that specialized in punchcutting and selling matrices. It was acquired and cast by various foundries, under different names.

      Salon-Antiqua is the name used by the Stempel foundry in Frankfurt, who first cast it around 1906. Bauer had it as Noblesse, Ludwig & Mayer as Kupferplatte. Dafi kindly shared a scan from a Haas specimen (“Nr. 300 x 1247, probably from the mid 1980s”), documenting that Salon-Antiqua was available from the Swiss foundry, too. Haas had been co-owned by Stempel since 1927, and Stempel ceased casting foundry type around 1986, so it’s not too surprising that a Stempel typeface ended up in a Haas specimen. In 1922, Haas had produced a similar typeface themselves, named Hermes-Antiqua.

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