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Girl! Girl! Girl! annuals (1970–1973)

Contributed by Florian Hardwig on May 23rd, 2021. Artwork published in
circa 1970
.
    September 1970, ft.  with green fill. The teaser text is in  Bold Condensed.
    Source: https://www.amazon.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    September 1970, ft. Edda with green fill. The teaser text is in Plantin Bold Condensed.

    Girl! Girl! Girl! is a lifestyle annual with “fabulous features on fashion, pop stars, astrology, boutiques, beauty and boys”, published by Purnell and Sons in Paulton, United Kingdom. This post shows the covers of the annuals for 1970, 1971, and 1973. See Christopher Bentley’s contribution for the 1972 edition featuring Arnold Böcklin.

    The 1971 issue contrasts the hippyish  with conformist  Bold.
    Source: https://www.instagram.com Lizzie Miles. License: All Rights Reserved.

    The 1971 issue contrasts the hippyish Roberta Fancy with conformist Helvetica Bold.

    The cover typography for the 1973 edition suggests that by then, the Art Nouveau revival was finally dead, and a reappraisal of Art Deco forms from the 1930s was the next big thing. The title appears to be lettering based on  (Letraset, 1970). “Fun Features and Stories of Romance” is set in  (1927).
    Source: https://www.pinterest.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    The cover typography for the 1973 edition suggests that by then, the Art Nouveau revival was finally dead, and a reappraisal of Art Deco forms from the 1930s was the next big thing. The title appears to be lettering based on Premier Shaded (Letraset, 1970). “Fun Features and Stories of Romance” is set in Futura (1927).

    Typefaces

    • Edda
    • Plantin
    • Roberta Fancy
    • Helvetica
    • Premier Shaded
    • Futura

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    1 Comment on “Girl! Girl! Girl! annuals (1970–1973)”

    1. Awesome selection of groovy early 1970s imagery, Florian and a fascinating insight into how fashions changed in font use at that time.

      So good to see something from the Roberta family in there, too, as seen at 'Lancelot Link, Secret Chimp’.

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