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Shaping the World by Antony Gormley and Martin Gayford

Contributed by Gareth Hague on Sep 27th, 2021. Artwork published in .
    Shaping the World by Antony Gormley and Martin Gayford 1
    Source: thamesandhudsonusa.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    From Thames & Hudson:

    In this wide-ranging book, two complementary voices – one belonging to an artist who looks to Asian and Buddhist traditions as much as to Western sculptural history, the other to a critic and historian – consider how sculpture has been central to the evolution of our potential for thinking and feeling. Sculpture cannot be seen in isolation as an aesthetic pursuit; it is related to humankind’s compelling urge to make its mark on the landscape, to build, make pictures, practise religion and develop philosophical thought.

    Jude is used for titles and headline type. The serif used for the running text is Carat; the sans serif on the cover is Caslon’s Egyptian [see comments].

    Shaping the World by Antony Gormley and Martin Gayford 2
    Source: www.amazon.co.uk License: All Rights Reserved.
    Shaping the World by Antony Gormley and Martin Gayford 3
    Source: thamesandhudsonusa.com License: All Rights Reserved.
    Shaping the World by Antony Gormley and Martin Gayford 4
    Source: www.amazon.co.uk License: All Rights Reserved.
    Shaping the World by Antony Gormley and Martin Gayford 5
    Source: thamesandhudsonusa.com License: All Rights Reserved.
    Shaping the World by Antony Gormley and Martin Gayford 6
    Source: www.amazon.co.uk License: All Rights Reserved.
    Shaping the World by Antony Gormley and Martin Gayford 7
    Source: thamesandhudsonusa.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Typefaces

    • Jude
    • Carat
    • Caslon’s Egyptian

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    4 Comments on “Shaping the World by Antony Gormley and Martin Gayford”

    1. The G is different to that cut of Caslon — no cross bar on the G

    2. I should’ve added: there’s an alternate G.

    3. Good sleuthing, p-k! I think you nailed it. The presentation on the old Font Bureau website makes it look like the G with bar was the default form once. It’s shown as an alternate on Type Network.

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