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Honig by Ian McEwan (Büchergilde Gutenberg)

Contributed by Florian Hardwig on Mar 29th, 2014. Artwork published in .
    Honig by Ian McEwan (Büchergilde Gutenberg) 1
    Source: https://www.buechergilde.de License: All Rights Reserved.

    Honig (original title: Sweet Tooth) is a Cold War spy novel about a young woman recruited by MI5, staged in 1970s England. So what could be more appropriate than a woman’s face behind a typewriter against a Union Jack? But wait, why does the painted typewriter have a German QWERTZ keyboard layout? Well, the font is Trixie, and Trixie was born on a German typewriter with a QWERTZ layout!

    Honig by Ian McEwan (Büchergilde Gutenberg) 2
    Source: https://www.buechergilde.de License: All Rights Reserved.

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    3 Comments on “Honig by Ian McEwan (Büchergilde Gutenberg)”

    1. Mine Creek says:
      Mar 31st, 2014  4:18 am

      I’ve been looking for an opportunity to share some details about a possible Trixie ancestor by Erik van Blokland called Lettera.

      The image below shows a basic layout.

      Look at those funky numbers!

      I’m curious if Trixie and Lettera share the same source specimen.

    2. Erik says:
      Mar 31st, 2014  11:54 am

      It’s possible. I like mine better though.

    3. Mine Creek says:
      Apr 1st, 2014  8:11 pm

      Hi Erik! Somebody must have incorrectly credited Lettera to you. Sorry about that.

      After further research, I’m starting to assume that Lettera was also based on type from an existing typewriter. Ironically enough, the wildly popular Olivetti Lettera series.

      Kris Sowersby wrote a pretty cool blog about the research and experiments that helped in developing his typewriter-inspired Pitch. In the blog, he writes about much of the typewriter typeface genre, he even mentions the Lettera typewriter.

      As Sowersby said in his blog, “Trixie is the final word in distressed digital typewriter typefaces.” I agree, it’s the best.

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