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Talking Heads: True Stories

Contributed by Matthijs Sluiter on Jul 3rd, 2015. Artwork published in .
    Back cover.
    Source: http://produto.mercadolivre.com.br License: All Rights Reserved.

    Back cover.

    Wikipedia: True Stories is the seventh album released by Talking Heads in 1986; it was released at the same time as the David Byrne film of the same name, True Stories.

    The album does not contain contain the actors’ performances from the film. Instead, this is a Talking Heads studio album featuring recordings of songs from the film. While an original cast recording for this movie was never released, several of the film performances did appear on single releases of several songs from the album.

    Later, lead singer Byrne released the album Sounds from True Stories containing incidental music from the soundtrack.

    Front cover.
    Source: http://produto.mercadolivre.com.br License: All Rights Reserved.

    Front cover.

    Historias Veridicas, issued in Argentina 1986, has all titles in spanish.
    Source: http://musica.mercadolibre.com.ar License: All Rights Reserved.

    Historias Veridicas, issued in Argentina 1986, has all titles in spanish.

    Album label print.
    Source: https://www.jiggyjamz.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    Album label print.

    European release from EMI.
    Source: http://www.discogs.com License: All Rights Reserved.

    European release from EMI.

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    4 Comments on “Talking Heads: True Stories

    1. It’s not certain that this is Permanent Headline, but a stretched version of the digital font (below) reveals that it’s very close. Only the flat top of the ‘G’ is a noticable difference. So I believe a phototype mod of the PH is not a bad guess.

    2. Was there a pre-digital oblique version of Permanent Headline at some point?

    3. Phototypesetting devices typically offered options to distort the letterforms, including stretching and slanting. Designs that wouldn’t benefit greatly from a manually created italic were simply obliqued.

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