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“Silberfall” christmas tree tinsel

Photo(s) by “altpapiersammler”. Imported from Flickr on Dec 19, 2015. Artwork published in
circa 1900
.
    23547706226_d0d274a89d_k.jpg
    Source: https://www.flickr.com Uploaded to Flickr by altpapiersammler and tagged with “reginakursiv”. License: All Rights Reserved.

    “Noblest Christmas tree hangings”, wrapped in parchment paper.

    Silberfall-detail.jpg
    License: All Rights Reserved.

    Detail

    Typefaces

    • Regina-Cursiv
    • Etienne schmal
    • Romana

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    1 Comment on ““Silberfall” christmas tree tinsel”

    1. Dec 26th, 2015  10:46 am

      “Silberfall” is rendered in an advertising face that was quite popular at the turn of the century. The amorphous cursive with the clubbed terminals was sold by many foundries, under different names. Berthold started to cast it sometime before 1897, under the name Regina-Kursiv. There is also a lighter style, Hansa-Kursiv (Berthold, 1895). Haas had both weights as Favorita. See the typeface page for more info.

      Glyph set of Regina-Cursiv

      Regina-Cursiv with its many alternate glyphs, as shown in a specimen by H. Berthold (Berlin) and Bauer & Co. (Stuttgart; acquired by Berthold in 1897). Source: Luc Devroye

      Regina Cursiv (HiH), Toffee Script, Koëlh

      There are various digitizations and interpretations, but none of them is complete, or especially well-drawn and spaced. From top to bottom: Regina Cursiv (HiH, 2007), Toffee Script (a loose interpretation by Suomi, 2010), and Koëlh (Yanick Blancho, 2015, based on a showing of FTF’s Provençales, the bold style of Pittoresques penchées). Koëlh comes closest to the letterforms used on the packaging. The differences between those and Regina-Kursiv – most notable in the ‘S’ – may also be due to extra alternates, or deviations between various sizes.

      The secondary face is equally known under various names, including Estienne or Schmale Etienne. “Made in Germany” uses one of the precursors of the digital typefaces known as Romana – Bitstream’s version has a similarly high-waisted ‘G’, but a more ample x-height.

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